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What impact did the US development of the atomic bomb have on World War II?

What impact did the US development of the atomic bomb have on World War II?

What impact did the US development of the atomic bomb have on World War II? After the US dropped atomic bombs on two major cities in Japan, Japan surrendered. After the US dropped atomic bombs on two major cities in Germany, Germany surrendered.

What were the impacts of the atomic bomb?

After six years of war the first atomic bombs were dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. More than 100,000 people were killed, and others subsequently died of radiation-induced cancers. The bombing brought the Second World War to an end.

Why did the atomic bomb cause the Japanese to surrender?

Japan surrendered because the Soviet Union entered the war. Japanese leaders said the bomb forced them to surrender because it was less embarrassing to say they had been defeated by a miracle weapon. Americans wanted to believe it, and the myth of nuclear weapons was born.

Why did Japanese soldiers fight to the death?

Fear of being killed after surrendering was one of the main factors which influenced Japanese troops to fight to the death, and a wartime US Office of Wartime Information report stated that it may have been more important than fear of disgrace and a desire to die for Japan.

Why did Japanese soldiers yell bonsai?

The word literally means “ten thousand years,” and it has long been used in Japan to indicate joy or a wish for long life. Japanese World War II troops typically yelled it in celebration, but they were also known to scream, “Tenno Heika Banzai,” roughly translated as “long live the Emperor,” while storming into battle.

Did Japanese soldiers yell Banzai?

Japanese soldiers honor the Emperor with the shout “Banzai” during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1938).

Why is Banzai offensive?

It is probably because the Japanese soldiers shouted “Tennouheika Banzai” when they were dying during World War II. In this context, they meant “Long live the Emperor” or “Salute the Emperor”. Abe, Namiko. Abe, Namiko.