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Why is the trolley problem a problem?

Why is the trolley problem a problem?

The trolley problem is part of almost every introductory course on ethics, and it’s about a vehicle killing people. As the trolley driver, you are not responsible for the failure of the brakes or the presence of the workers on the track, so doing nothing means the unintentional death of five people.

Would you kill the fat man Summary?

In this book, David Edmonds, coauthor of the best-selling Wittgenstein’s Poker, tells the riveting story of why and how philosophers have struggled with this ethical dilemma, sometimes called the trolley problem. In the process, he provides an entertaining and informative tour through the history of moral philosophy.

Is the Trolley Problem flawed?

The so-named Trolley Problem first originated in 1905, and since its full development as a thought experiment in 1967 by Philippa Foot, it has captivated the on-going attention of philosophers and psychologists for decades.

Would you kill the fat man citation?

Would you kill the fat man?: the trolley problem and what your answer tells us about right and wrong. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press. Edmonds, David, 1964-.

Would you kill the fat man Goodreads?

Would You Kill the Fat Man?: The Trolley Problem and What Your Answer Tells Us about Right and Wrong. A runaway train is racing toward five men who are tied to the track. Unless the train is stopped, it will inevitably kill all five men. You are standing on a footbridge looking down on the unfolding disaster.

Would you pull the lever leading to one death but saving five?

From a simple utilitarian point of view, the dilemma is the same — do you sacrifice one life to save five? — and the answer is the same: yes. Interestingly, however, many people who would pull the lever in the first scenario would not push the man in this second scenario.

Is it right to sacrifice the few to save the many?

If you are a Utilitarian, then sacrificing the few for the need of the many is a reasonable thing to do. If you are a Utilitarian, then sacrificing the few for the need of the many is a reasonable thing to do.

What is moral Judgement examples?

People articulate a moral judgment, for example, when they say that an action is right or wrong, that a person is good or bad, or that a situation is just or unjust. Athletes frequently make moral judgments about moral issues that arise in sports, and such judgments have been investigated by sport psychologists.